Margaret and Eve (Margaret of Greenwich (R) Book 5)

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Courtship and marriage, jealousy and vengeance: the joys and perils of true love in music from Haydn to Richard Rodgers. A century of American music—from MacDowell to Musto, Berlin to Bernstein, Griffes to Gordon—offers a panoramic view of how we lived in the twentieth century. Aimez-vous Brahms? Songs on the beauty and folly of youth, the fountain of youth, lost youth, and the envy of youth in works by the child Mozart, Reynaldo Hahn, Aaron Kernis, Poulenc and others.

NYFOS embarks on a full evening commission of sixteen composers and lyricists in songs examining the future. A joyous celebration of light opera from Vienna to Broadway. Peerless comic novelist P. An air of austerity, freshness, and intense privacy lends these songs a rare beauty.

Their songs, full of the hopes, joys, and struggles of twentieth-century Americans from the working class to the patrician blue blood, remind us how much this country has to sing about. A concert of classic and rarely heard songs in honor of the great American composer and lyricist teams of the twentieth century: the Gershwin brothers; Bernstein, Comden and Green; Rodgers and Hart; Rodgers and Hammerstein; Lerner and Loewe; Bock and Harnick; Kander and Ebb; Leiber and Stoller, and others. NYFOS pairs rarely-heard works by two monarchs of American songwriting— a beloved kind, an elusive duke—to contrast their shining glories.

An irreverent group of Harvard schoolmates, the New York School of poets and their friends shocked and delighted audiences of the ss with their evullient sense of the absurd. Composers born or educated in Barcelona capture the heart of that enchanting city in song. Works by Mompou, Toldra, Granados, Vives and many others, in styles ranging from art song to zarzuela. Music of Pauline Viardot, great coloratura soprano of the late 19th century. Scenes and verses inspired by Greek mythology and poetry, ancient and modern. An homage to two great 20th century Russian poets, Alexander Blok and Anna Akhmatova, their poet friends and followers.

Moss, A. Rossi, A. American Women of Science Britannica Yearbook of Science and the Future Famous American Women More Heroes of Civilization Louisiana Academy of Sciences Proceedings New York magazine 13 Aug. NY NYTM 26 Apr. SR Science The American anthropologist a scientist who studies human beings and their origins, distribution, and relationships Margaret Mead developed the field of culture and personality research and was a leading influence in introducing the concept of culture into education, medicine, and public policy.

Margaret Mead was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 16, She grew up in a free-thinking intellectual home. Her mother, Emily Fogg Mead, was a sociologist a scientist who studies social group behaviors and an early supporter of women's rights. Margaret's grandmother, Martha Ramsay Mead, a child psychologist a scientist who studies the mind and its behavior , played an active role in the lives of Margaret, her three sisters and her brother. It was her grandmother who first taught Margaret to watch the behavior of the younger children to figure out the reasons behind their actions.

Mead's childhood school days were unusual in that she only attended one year of half days in the fourth grade and six total years at various high schools. This "formal" education was very much supplemented by all of the educators in her family. Mead loved tradition and ritual, so she joined the Episcopal church at the age of eleven. This faith would be her strength throughout her life. Mead at first wanted to be a painter when she grew up, but such intellectual role models led her to college thinking of English as a field of study.

Mead thrived on change outside of her religious beliefs. Her senior year anthropology course with Franz Boas — was the most powerful event in her life, since it was then that she decided to become an anthropologist. She graduated from Barnard in In the same year she married Luther Cressman and entered the anthropology department of Columbia University.

The Columbia department at this time consisted of Boas, who taught everything, and Ruth Benedict — , his only assistant. The catastrophe of World War I — 18; a war between the Central powers — led by Germany — and the Allies: England , the United States , Italy, and other nations and the displacement of people that followed had its impact on the developing study of anthropology.

Anthropologists began to ask how their knowledge of the nature of humankind might be used to clarify current problems. At the same time the influence of Sigmund Freud — was beginning to affect all of behavioral human action sciences. The atmosphere in the Columbia department was charged with excitement, and whole new perspectives for anthropology were opening up.

Mead completed her studies in and set off for a year of fieldwork in Samoa in the face of opposition from older colleagues people in the same area of interest worried about sending a young woman alone to a Pacific island. She was going to study the life of adolescent girls. She learned the native language one of seven she eventually mastered and lived in a Samoan household as "one of the girls. On returning from the field Mead became assistant curator one in charge of the museum of ethnology the science of classifying mankind into races at the American Museum of Natural History, where she remained, eventually becoming curator and, in , curator emeritus honorary title.

Her goal in going to the museum was "to make Americans understand cultural anthropology as well as they understood archaeology [study of material remains, fossils, rocks, of past human life and activity]. Her project was the study of the thought of young children, testing some of the then current theories. Her study of children's thought in its sociocultural having both social and cultural elements context is described in Growing Up in New Guinea She later returned to the village of Peri, where this study was made, after twenty-five years, when the children she had known in were leaders of a community going through the difficulties of change to modern life.

She described this change, with flashbacks to the earlier days, in New Lives for Old Mead's interest in psychiatry had turned her attention to the problem of the cultural context of schizophrenia a mental disorder whose symptoms are a detachment to one's environment and a breakdown of one's personality — thoughts, feelings, and actions.

With this in mind she went to Bali , a society where going into a trance the state of complete unconscious and other forms of dissociation an escape from the outer world into an inner one are culturally approved and encouraged. The Balinese study was especially noteworthy for development of new field techniques. The extensive use of film made it possible to record and analyze significant details of behavior that had escaped the pencil-and-paper recordings. Of the thirty — eight thousand photographs which Mead and Bateson brought back, seven hundred fifty — nine were selected for Balinese Character , a joint study with Bateson.

This publication marks a major change in the recording and presentation of ethnological data and may prove in the long run to be one of her most significant contributions to the science of anthropology. Largely through the work of Ruth Benedict and Mead, the relevance of anthropology to problems of public policy was recognized though somewhat belatedly. When World War II — 45; a war between the Axis powers: Japan , Italy, and Germany — and the Allies: England, France , the Soviet Union , and the United States brought the United States into contact with peoples just coming from colonialism a control of a group of people or area by a foreign government , the need to understand many lifestyles became obvious.

Mead conducted a nationwide study of American food habits prior to the introduction of rationing process in war time of conserving goods for soldiers by portioning them out sparingly to citizens. Later she was sent to England to try to explain to the British the habits of the American soldiers who were suddenly among them. Mead drew heavily on psychology, especially learning theory and psychoanalysis type of treatment for emotional disorders in which a patient talks through childhood experiences and looks at the significance of dreams.

In return she contributed significantly to the development of psychoanalytic theory by emphasizing the importance of culture in personality development. She served on many national and international committees for mental health and was instrumental in introducing the study of culture into training programs for physicians and social workers.

Mead was a dominant force in developing the field of culture and personality and the related field of national character research. Her theoretical position is based on the assumption that an individual matures within a cultural context which includes an ideological system ideas , the expectations of others, and techniques of socialization methods of fitting in with one's social environment which affect not only outward responses but also the inner mental structure.

Mead was criticized by certain other social scientists for neglecting quantitative measuring methods and for what has been called "anecdotal" relying on short stories of interesting incidents for proof handling of data. She was also accused of applying concepts of individual psychology to the analysis of social process while ignoring historical and economic factors.

But since her concern lay with predicting the behavior of individuals within a given social setting and not with the development of institutions, the criticism does not hold much weight. There is no question that Mead was one of the leading American intellectuals of the twentieth century. Through her best-selling books, her public lectures, and her well-read column in Redbook magazine, Mead popularized anthropology in the United States.

She was also a role model for American women, encouraging them to pursue professional careers previously closed to women while at the same time championing their roles as mothers. New York: Morrow, Foerstel, Leonara, and Angela Gilliam, eds. Margaret Mead's Contradictory Legacy. The American anthropologist Margaret Mead developed the field of culture and personality research and was a dominant influence in introducing the concept of culture into education, medicine, and public policy.

Margaret Mead was born in Philadelphia, Pa. She grew up there in a liberal intellectual atmosphere. Her father, Edward Sherwood Mead, was a professor in the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce and the founder of the University of Pennsylvania 's evening school and extension program. Her mother, Emily Fogg Mead, was a sociologist and an early advocate of woman's rights.

In Mead entered DePauw University but transferred after a year to Barnard College, where she majored in psychology. In her senior year she had a course in anthropology with Franz Boas which she later described as the most influential event in her life, since it was then that she decided to become an anthropologist. The Columbia department at this time consisted of Boas, who taught everything, and Ruth Benedict , his only assistant. The catastrophe of World War I and the dislocations that followed it had had their impact on the developing discipline of anthropology.

Anthropologists began to ask how their knowledge of the nature of humankind might be used to illuminate contemporary problems. At the same time the influence of Sigmund Freud was beginning to be felt in all the behavioral sciences. The atmosphere in the Columbia department was charged with intellectual excitement, and whole new perspectives for anthropology were opening up.

Mead completed her studies in and set off for a year's fieldwork in Samoa in the face of opposition from older colleagues worried about sending a young woman alone to a Pacific island. Her problem was to study the life of adolescent girls. On returning from the field Mead became assistant curator of ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, where she remained, eventually becoming curator and, in , curator emeritus.

Her mandate in going to the museum was "to make Americans understand cultural anthropology as well as they understood archaeology. When Mead wrote Coming of Age in Samoa , her publisher, concerned that the book fell into no conventional category, asked for a chapter on what the work's significance would be for Americans. The result was the final chapter, "Education for Choice," which set the basic theme for much of her lifework.

Her study of children's thought in its sociocultural context is described in Growing Up in New Guinea She later returned to the village of Peri, where this study was made, after 25 years, when the children she had known in were leaders of a community going through the difficulties of transition to modern life. She described this transition, with flashbacks to the earlier days, in New Lives for Old Mead's interest in psychiatry had turned her attention to the problem of the cultural context of schizophrenia, and with this in mind she went to Bali, a society where trance and other forms of dissociation are culturally sanctioned.

The extensive use of film made it possible to record and analyze significant minutiae of behavior that escape the pencil-and-paper ethnographer. Of the 38, photographs which Mead and Bateson brought back, were selected for Balinese Character , a joint study with Bateson. This publication marks a major innovation in the recording and presentation of ethnological data and may prove in the long run to be one of her most significant contributions to the science of anthropology.

Largely through the work of Ruth Benedict and Margaret Mead, the relevance of anthropology to problems of public policy was recognized to a degree, though somewhat belatedly. When World War II brought the United States into contact with allies, enemies, and peoples just emerging from colonialism, the need to understand many lifestyles became apparent.

Mead conducted a nationwide study of American food habits prior to the introduction of rationing. Later she was sent to England to try to explain to the British the habits of the American soldiers who were suddenly thrust among them. After the war she worked as director of Research in Contemporary Cultures, a cross-cultural, trans-disciplinary project applying the insights and some of the methods of anthropology to the study of complex modern cultures. An overall view of the methods and some of the insights gained is contained in The Study of Cultures at a Distance For the theoretical basis of her work in the field of culture and personality Margaret Mead drew heavily on psychology, especially learning theory and psychoanalysis.

In the s Mead became deeply concerned with the unrest among the young. Her close contact with students gave her special insight into the unmet needs of youth—for better education, for autonomy, for an effective voice in decisions that affect their lives in a world which adults seem no longer able to control. Some of her views on these problems are set forth in Culture and Commitment Her thoughts on human survival under the threats of war, over-population, and degradation of the environment are contained in A Way of Seeing Ever since Margaret Mead taught a class of young working women in , she became deeply involved in education, both in the universities and in interpreting the lessons of anthropology to the general public.

She joined the anthropology department at Columbia University in and also taught at Fordham University and the universities of Cincinnati and Topeka. She also lectured to people all over America and Europe. Mead died in and was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Margaret Mead was a dominant force in developing the field of culture and personality and the related field of national character research. Stated briefly, her theoretical position is based on the assumption that an individual matures within a cultural context which includes an ideological system, the expectations of others, and techniques of socialization which condition not only outward responses but also inner psychic structure.

Mead was criticized by certain other social scientists on methodological and conceptual grounds. She was criticized for neglecting quantitative methods in favor of depth analysis and for what has been called "anecdotal" handling of data. On the theoretical side she was accused of applying concepts of individual psychology to the analysis of social process while ignoring historical and economic factors. But since her concern lay with predicting the behavior of individuals within a given social context and not with the origin of institutions, the criticism is irrelevant.

There is no question that Mead was one of the leading American intellectuals of the 20th century. Through her best-selling books, her public lecturing, and her popular column in Redbook magazine, Mead popularized anthropology in the United States. She also provided American women with a role model, encouraging them to pursue professional careers previously closed to women while at the same time championing their roles as mothers.

See also Anthropologists and What They Do , which was written for high school students and contains accounts of her life in the university and in the field. Hoffman R. The most celebrated anthropologist of the twentieth century, Margaret Mead — was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 16, and died in New York City on November Her career began with a shift from psychology when Ruth Benedict — and Franz Boas — , two of her teachers at Columbia, attracted her with Benedict's challenge that they had "nothing to offer but an opportunity to do work that matters.

Mead's career took off when she went to Samoa at age twenty-three to study adolescent girls and to explore whether the emotional strains of adolescence were uniform across cultures or varied depending on socialization and experience. This led to her first book, Coming of Age in Samoa , a bestseller that gave many readers their first awareness that their assumptions about human behavior might not always apply. Although this book was caricatured and attacked by the anthropologist Derek Freeman in , twenty years of debate has affirmed her descriptions, showing that Freeman's insistence on the biological determination of variations observed fifty years after Mead's work in other areas of Samoa supplemented but could not refute Mead's basic emphasis on learned—and therefore potentially variable—behavior.

Mead's subsequent fieldwork up until World War II took her to four different New Guinea societies and to the Omaha tribe of Nebraska with her second husband, Reo Fortune, and then to Bali and another New Guinea society, the Iatmul, with her third husband, the anthropologist and ecological thinker Gregory Bateson.

During this period, she focused primarily on child rearing and personality development and secondarily on gender differences, where she pioneered the comparative study of gender roles. Her work appeared both in further trade books such as Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies and in detailed technical monographs such as The Mountain Arapesh published in three parts, — , establishing the pattern of applying her findings in the field to the dilemmas of industrialized society, and writing in several genres for different audiences.

She also innovated in methodology, beginning the use of projective tests in fieldwork and, with Bateson, invented a new technique of visual anthropology exemplified in Balinese Character Her fieldwork archives are available at the Library of Congress. World War II led Mead and other social scientists to focus on industrialized nations as part of the war effort. Mead collaborated with Benedict in developing the application of anthropology to contemporary cultures made inaccessible by war and political conflict, primarily through the Columbia University Research in Contemporary Cultures project.

This methodology, described in The Study of Culture at a Distance , which led to multiple publications by many authors, involved the creation of interdisciplinary and intercultural teams not unlike contemporary focus groups, and the analysis of literary and artistic materials in ways that anticipated contemporary cultural studies.

Mead founded the Institute for Intercultural Studies in New York in to house these projects and a variety of later activities. The war had precipitated rapid and often devastating culture change, and Mead's postwar focus was on change, particularly the possibilities of purposive culture change. In she returned to Pere, a Manus village in the Admiralty Islands now part of Papua New Guinea she had studied with Fortune, to analyze the effects of the war on a community with little previous outside contact. In Manus, she found that a charismatic leader had promoted the choice of integration into the outside world and the villagers were positive about change rather than demoralized by it; that rapid change is sometimes preferable to gradual change; and that children could play a key transformative role Mead Mead was one of those who introduced the concept of "culture" into the thinking of readers, with profound intellectual and ethical results, but her emphasis on purposive culture change reaffirmed ethical issues avoided by some cultural relativists, and she insisted that many human institutions, such as those of warfare and racism, be seen as human inventions that could be modified or replaced, rather than as "natural" and unavoidable.

Her understanding of the role of individuals and groups in the remaking of Manus society was key to her book Continuities in Cultural Evolution , best summarized in her often quoted phrase, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world.

Mead believed that the understanding of cultural diversity offered a new kind of freedom to human societies, and she worked tirelessly and skillfully to disseminate anthropological ideas, lectured widely, published profusely, and was quick to understand the possibilities of new media. Unlike many academics, she saw communicating to the public as a professional obligation of comparable intellectual integrity to her more narrow professional writing.

At the same time, Mead worked with colleagues in other fields who kept her close to new developments in biology and neurology. She was associated for more than fifty years with the American Museum of Natural History, serving in her later years as its Curator of Ethnology.

She received twenty-eight honorary degrees, more than forty academic and scientific awards, and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom following her death in Banner, Lois W. New York: Knopf. A scholarly examination of Mead's early personal and professional relationships. New York: Harper Collins. Hillsdale, NJ: L. One of many scholarly refutations of the Freeman attacks. Freeman, Derek New York: Perennial Classics.

Kinship in the Admiralty Islands. New York: HarperCollins. The Mountain Arapesh, 2 Vol. New York: Berghahn Books. Written as a contribution to the war effort. New York: Perennial. Continuities in Cultural Evolution.

Margaret Mead

Includes Mead's theoretical discussion of the role of small groups in cultural change. New York: Kodansha. Mead's partial autobiography. Robert B. A selection of Mead's writings about the future.

Margaret

Mead, Margaret, and Gregory Bateson. Mead, Margaret, and Rhoda Metraux, eds. The Study of Culture at a Distance. A manual developed from research in contemporary cultures. Mead completed her education with an M. In the mids she became a curator of anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York , where she spent her entire professional life. In a career that lasted over fifty years, Mead was an energetic researcher, prolific author, sought-after public speaker, influential public thinker, and tireless champion for the young discipline of anthropology.

21st-century British women

Mead's research on several cultures in the South Pacific during the s and s, including Samoans, Manus, Balinese, and the Arapesh, Mundugumor, Tchambuli, and Iatmul of New Guinea , led to a number of popular books and professional monographs. Her research focused primarily on childhood, youth, and adolescence, as well as kinship and social organization. She is also known as the founder of the culture-and-personality school of cultural anthropology. Although Mead is not well known for her contributions to the study of religion, she nevertheless wrote about religion for both professional and popular audiences.

Mead's research on religion in her professional work is reflected in her detailed monograph on Arapesh supernaturalism It is her most comprehensive description of an indigenous religious system, containing extensive data on this New Guinea tribal culture's cosmology, myths, ritual beliefs, and practices. In this work, she gave special attention to rites of passage.

Mead also published articles on taboo, magic, and men's houses in New Guinea. Based on her extensive fieldwork on the island of Manus, off the coast of New Guinea, she wrote about the belief in animism among adults and children, as well as long-term religious change in New Lives for Old She also described a revitalization movement on Manus Their documentary, Trance and Dance in Bali , is considered a classic in ethnographic film. In most of Mead's work on indigenous cultures, though, religion was tangential to other topics.

For example, in Coming of Age in Samoa , she briefly discussed the role of Christianity in the lives of adolescent girls. Mead viewed Christianity as playing a relatively benign role in adolescent socialization and was subsequently criticized by anthropologist Derek Freeman for not fully addressing what he viewed as the harsh and puritanical Christian morality of the time Freeman, Mead also wrote a chapter on the child and the supernatural in Growing Up in New Guinea and one on religious institutions in The Changing Culture of an Indian Tribe Although she wrote about religion based on her fieldwork, Mead's detailed ethnographic work on religion did not provide major contributions to theories of religion.

She favored a more scientific, psychological, and developmental approach to religion that was superseded by more humanistic, symbolic approaches in anthropology. Mead's pioneering descriptions published in the s and s yielded to the interpretive ideas of Clifford Geertz, Victor Turner, and Mary Douglas in the s and thereafter. And, while Mead was a forerunner of feminist approaches to the study of culture in general, she did not offer a feminist approach to the study of religion. Mead wrote a good deal about religion in her role as a public intellectual, especially in her later life.

She was very interested in religion in her own life, in the United States , and in the world at large. Although her parents were atheists, at age eleven Mead asked to be baptized. Her first husband, Luther Cressman, was an Episcopalian minister, and early in their courtship Mead planned to be a minister's wife. As she became a professional anthropologist, her goals changed. Yet Mead continued to be a religious person, unlike most of her colleagues in anthropology.

Unknown to many of her friends, she secretly maintained her Christian faith. In the s, she saw a new role for Christianity in the world community, involving issues like civil rights and ecumenism.

The Farewell

She was asked to be a representative for the Episcopal Church to the World Council of Churches , which she attended for several years. Mead was deeply involved in this project and authored Twentieth Century Faith: Hope and Survival about religion in the age of technology. Mead also wrote a number of opinion pieces on religion for the lay public in religious magazines and for her long-running column in Redbook magazine.

She discussed the spiritual dimensions of birth control , the right to die, women as priests, the contemporary fascination with the occult, and other issues of the day. Mead saw no conflict between religion and science, and she envisioned a world where the faiths of other cultures would not be considered inferior. In her role as a public intellectual, she wrote more extensively on religion for a popular audience than she had for her peers in anthro-pology.

Cambridge, Mass. Gordan, Joan. Margaret Mead : The Complete Bibliography, — The Hague, Howard, Jane. New York, The Mountain Arapesh; Vol. New Haven , Conn. Shankman, Paul " Mead, Margaret. Shankman, Paul "Mead, Margaret. Margaret Mead was born in Philadelphia to a family of educators. In her youth, her main influences were her mother and maternal grandmother, both of whom had raised families and also pursued careers.

Mead's formal education before entering college was sporadic, and she was mainly educated at home by her grandmother. An unhappy year at DePauw University turned Mead against coeducation, and she subsequently transferred to Barnard College. She first concentrated in English and psychology but became interested in anthropology under the influence of Columbia University anthropologists Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict Boas was urgently organizing ethnographic investigations of primitive cultures throughout the world before eventual contact with modern society, and he convinced Mead that she could make a contribution to this burgeoning field.

After receiving her M. Living with her research subjects in a Samoan village, Mead was the first American to use the participant-observer method developed by British anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski Upon her return to the United States , she received her Ph. Mead did extensive field work throughout the s and s. After her initial trip, she was always joined by a collaborator. These included her second husband, New Zealand psychologist Reo Fortune, and her third husband, the British anthropologist Gregory Bateson, whom she married in Mead and Bateson conducted two years of intensive field work together in Bali , pursuing their different research interests.

They pioneered the use of film as a resource for anthropological research, shooting some 22, feet of film as well as thousands of still photographs. A tireless investigator, she made many repeat visits to her research sites; over a year period, she observed the Manus people seven times. Having studied seven different Pacific cultures as well as the Omaha tribe of North America , Mead became convinced of the importance of culture as a determinant of personality , following in the footsteps of Alfred Adler in the field of psychology and Ruth Benedict in anthropology.

Mead detailed her theories of character formation and culture in Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies and expanded further on the role of culture in gender formation in her work, Male and Female: A Study of the Sexes in a Changing World. Although Mead's stature as an anthropologist is unquestioned, there has been some speculation that her subjects may have systematically lied to her during her investigations.

He died unexpectedly after just starting chemotherapy. A Memorial service will be at Valley Bible church. Time and day are pending He was predeceased by his daughter, Sandra Harris. He is also survived by five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. John Jay was proud of his service in the Air Force and loved to wear his Air force cap. John Jay lived the last ten years making many friends at Ridgeview Commons in Pleasanton. Mass and private burial January 3 at St.

Michael's Livermore. In lieu of flowers, family requests that any donations be made to a charity of your choice The world lost a shining light and beautiful soul on December 12, , when Brandi Shasta Blotz Costa passed away unexpectedly of natural causes. Brandi cherished her friends and family and adored being a Mom to her son, Isaiah.

She recently married her beloved soul-mate, Mark, and was enjoying building their home and lives together with Isaiah. Her beautiful smile was most radiant when she was visiting the Santa Cruz Boardwalk to ride The Big Dipper and enjoy a walk along the beach. Most importantly, Brandi loved deeply and lived her life with the greatest enthusiasm. Brandi will be forever missed by her Husband, Mark Costa Jr. John F. Jack Bostedt passed away in Kalispell, Montana, at age 90 on December 10, His father and grandfather were commercial fishermen, and Jack spent his childhood enjoying the outdoor life.

He was a lifelong fan of his beloved Green Bay Packers, and attended his first game in He began his career in civil engineering with the City of Salinas. Jack moved to Bigfork, Montana, in He continued his engineering career in the Flathead Valley. Rosemary Gabrielle Gallagher Feb. Rosemary was born in Hayward, Calif and shortly thereafter her family moved to Oakland where she was raised and eventually met her loving husband of 63 years, Cedric Gallagher.

As a child Rosemary had a strong interest in drawing. Her interest expanded to oil painting and watercolors, which she pursued through the Livermore Art Association for many years after moving to Pleasanton in She formed many lasting friendships in the Association and remained active with her art until late in life. Rosemary always loved gardens and some of her happiest memories are from her years as an employee at Alden Lane Nursery in Livermore.

It was a period in her life of camaraderie and hard work in the open air working with plants. She loved relating stori Douglas Eloyd Safreno Oct. Douglas Eloyd Safreno passed away peacefully on Wednesday, November 28th with his family by his side. He was 94 years old. He was bright and spry up until his last few days.

He never lost his mischievous smile or the twinkle in his eyes. Doug met Mary in through a friend and they were married 3 months later. They have lived in Pleasanton for the 65 years that they were married. He went on to purchase, develop and own commercial real estate in Pleasanton. Doug passed on his love for the outdoors to his children: Lynda, Casey and Ty. He spent many hours swimming, fishing, camping, boating, traveling and hunting. He was an avid reader of several periodicals and business tex Barry Winston Shoemaker, M.

Pleasanton, CA Barry W. Shoemaker, M. He was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Shoemaker, an anesthesiologist, practiced medicine for 43 years. During this time, he also attended Veterans Hospital in Buffalo, New York for his anesthesiology residency. He was a highly regarded anesthesiologist in the East Bay community and his greatest focus was patient comfort.

Jeffrey Scott May Aug. Jeffrey Scott May passed away on Saturday, November 10th after suffering a heart attack. His passing was a shock and he will be greatly missed. He leaves a lasting legacy as an exemplary father, husband, coach, artist, and man of faith. He attended the University of Arkansas, earning a B. He also held a M. Jeff had a long and successful career as an engineer. From to , he was a Sr. Systems Engineer at General Dynamics, where he designed and developed software for the F fighter plane. Jeff will be remembered for his dedication in service to the Pleasanton community.

He faithfully loved and attended Valley Community Church for over 20 years. He and his wife Kristi, welcomed children in need of temporary foster care into their home through the organizatio Margaret Blades July 8, - Oct. Margaret Blades, 96, died Oct. She and husband Jim lived in Orinda, Danville, and Pleasanton. Margaret grew up on Barbados with 5 sisters. She was a student in the Royal Drawing Society and enjoyed her artistic side until the end of her life. She was grandmother to five, and great grandmother to Daisy.

Margaret was very active in her community. When Orinda had no Episcopal Church, she called every family in the phone book until she had recruited almost families so that the Bishop would fund the building of St. Estelle Newcomb Dec. Estelle Newcomb passed away suddenly and peacefully from respiratory failure on October 18, She was a Tri-Valley resident for 45 years, before moving to the Peninsula. Pre-deceased by her husband, Peter, and son, Steve, she is survived by her daughters, Caroline and Lucie, extended family and many friends.

Canadian by birth, Estelle, who became an American citizen, was known for being a kind, thoughtful contributor. She truly loved helping others. She was active in local charitable organizations wherever she lived. Small in stature, great in heart, long on impact, Estelle will be remembered and cherished always. A Memorial Mass will be held in the coming months Jerry Lynn Hill Aug. Jerry Lynn Hill, of St. Jerry served in the Air Force from to He was the owner of Jerry's Exxon in Pleasanton.

Jerry was married to his loving wife, Pat for 51 years. He was preceded in death by his brothers, James Hill and Paul Hill. Jerry enjoyed his family most of all. He also liked fishing, western movies, Oakland Raiders football, The St. Louis Cardinals, and San Jose Sharks hockey.

NYFOS – New York Festival of Song – No Song is Safe from Us - » Program History

He was a very proud resident of Pleasanton and volunteered tirelessly with the Jaycees and Pleasanton Lions Club. Friends and family members are welcome to attend the celebration of life service on a later date Barbara Starr Christensen Dec. Barbara Starr Christensen passed away peacefully in her home on Tuesday, October 16th in Pleasanton CA with her daughter and son-in-law lovingly caring for her.

She graduated from Las Lomas High School in Distinct as a woman of her era, Barbara truly had a love for adventure. Following high school, Barbara decided to move to Hawaii, where she worked as a tour directress and immersed herself in the beauty of the islands. While working at Standard Oil, Barbara met her husband William Christensen, who encouraged her to continue to pursue her love of travel by joining him at Matson Luxury Cruise Lines. Together, they traveled throughout the South Pacific and Australia.

In February of , when her only child, Laurel was born, Barbara transitioned into civilian life as a full-time mother. Joseph Rolland Freitas June 8, - Oct. As was his style, he was surrounded by family and friends until the end. Joe retired from ServiceMaster as an environmental services manager at San Jose State in , then enjoyed traveling with his family, refurbishing his home in Ben Lomond, and sharing smiles on his weekly Meals for Wheels route.

He loved his five grandchildren, seven nieces and nephews and the blessings of his extended family through his 23 year marriage to Ellen. Joe was preceded in death by his parents, Joe and Elaine, and brother, Jerry. Services, followed by a reception, will be held at am on October 25 at St. Augustine Catholic Church, Bernal Ave. He will be laid to rest at All Souls Cemetery in Va Janet Lee Bachand April 19, - Oct. After high school, Janet attended Fresno State where she met her husband Steve. Janet and Steve were married in and moved to the Bay Area where Janet was a marketing manager for Almaden Vineyards.

After Almaden left the southbay, she had a number of marketing related jobs before finding her passion working with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and other helpful psychological instruments working at Consulting Psychologists Press. Janet was a fun loving and outgoing person who loved reading, working out, nature and travel. She was known for her positive attitude, candor and being genuine and, of course, her smile. Martha-marie "Marty" Huntze July 12, - Oct. In June she married Douglas Huntze and moved to Pleasanton that summer.

Marty enjoyed trips to the Russian River and to McCloud where they built their second home. Marty always made the effort to keep in contact with family and friends.


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For many years Marty and Doug hosted a 4th of July party to watch the fair fireworks and an annual Christmas Eve party in their home. Many have described her like a hummingbird, as she was always on the go. Marty enjoyed reading, driving on road trips, camping at Fowlers campground on the McCloud river, several trips to Hawaii, playing tennis and softball, water skiing, snow skiing, browsing through garage sales, water a Shirley Schwab Feb. In loving memory of Shirley Schwab Blacklock , a longtime resident of Fremont, who passed away peacefully on Friday, October She was preceded in death by her husband Joe, a San Francisco native, and four sisters and two brothers.

Anna , 11 grandchildren and five great grandchildren. A native of Taft and former Pleasanton resident, Shirley was adored by all who knew her. We are all devastated and heartbroken by her passing, but her memory also fills us with joy. Everybody loved Shirley. She had a sweet soul and the strength to raise five children. She was a longtime legal secretary, a great cook and an ardent Giants and 49ers fan.

Nothing made her happier than spending time with family and friends. With a natural warmth, quick wit and sharp mind, Shirley loved her family unconditionally. She enjoyed talking sports and politics and always had something interesting to say. She was very well-read. Shirley was also a constant companion with her husb Diana Lee Olazaba April 6, - Oct. Born in Portville, CA. George Harold Becker April 4, - Sept. George Harold Becker Jr.

A native of Chicago, George moved from Southern California to Pleasanton with his young family in He commuted long hours to his job with the San Francisco Newspaper Agency as a journeyman pressman and member of the Graphics Communications International Union. At home, he grew roses and tomatoes and he was a tremendous supporter of his late wife Kristina's quilting and needle arts.

His tour of duty to 22 ports in 13 countries ignited a lifelong passion for travel and he and Kristina enjoyed many trips together throughout the United States and abroad. George was a humble man, well known to the neighborhood children and beloved by his family and friends. He liked reading the daily newspaper, watching history documentaries and enjoying a good meal. A son, Eric; daughter, Ingrid and son-in-law, Joe Cabrales, survive him.

He is also survived by his brother-in-law, Svante Mannervik; sister in-law, Margareta Mannervik; two nephews, Bjorn and Ulf and two nieces, Ylva and Asa Marge Johnson April 29, - Sept. Marge Johnson passed away peacefully on Wednesday, September 19th in Pleasanton. Marge was born in Minnesota in , grew up in Long Beach, California, and attended Stanford University where she met her husband of 57 years, Rudolph Johnson, whom she married in She worked as a teacher for many years before becoming a successful realtor, working in Palo Alto and Pleasanton.

Marge was active in community affairs her entire life, including serving as president of local organizations including the Stanford Club and local chapters of the American Association of University Women and the Great Books Council. Her hobbies included reading and travel. All are invited. Memorial donations may be made to St. James Wayland Reding Aug. James Wayland Reding, a life-long resident of Pleasanton, passed away on September 8, , after a courageous month battle with brain cancer.

He was 49 years old. He continued his education at Chico State University, where he received his BA degree in , and at Chapman University, where he received his teaching credential. Jim spent the last 14 years as a teacher at Wells Middle School in Dublin. Jim was a devoted family man. He enjoyed camping and fishing and had a love for travel and family traditions, which included a cherished annual Thanksgiving trip to Maui. Jim was a genuinely kind and accepting friend to all and was always the life of the party.

He was known for having the best barbeque ribs around. William Walburn Halvorsen Sept. William Walburn Halvorsen, a 50 year resident of Livermore, died on August 29, He was 72 years old.


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  • He immediately enlisted for the United States Marine Corps serving as a combat aircrew member in Santo Domingo and a tour in Vietnam In , he joined the Pleasanton Fire Department which merged into the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department where he dedicated the rest of his 32 years of service.

    Bill met and Mary Jo Penny Catherine Evans April 24, — August 25, It is with great sadness that our wonderful mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend, Penny Evans passed to the waiting arms of the love of her life, Bill Evans Sr. Everyone who knew Penny loved her. She lived a full and rich life surrounded by the people she loved and felt blessed to have a wonderful family and friends. Born in Duluth, Minnesota to Virgil R. Nichols and Catherine J. Smith, Penny was the eldest of three children. The family, including her two younger brothers moved to California in and settled in Sacramento.

    Penny met Bill Evans Sr. It was love at first sight, the couple were inseparable, and they married after a short courtship of eight weeks. She missed him every day and often spoke of joining him in heaven. Penny and Bill were blessed with fo James Wulferdingen Oct. James Louis Wulferdingen died of cancer on August 22, Jim was born in Berkeley, California in , and was a fifth generation Berkeley native. Jim was an amazingly creative person with the ability to build just about anything, a talent he freely shared with friends and family.

    He was an animal lover and had many pets but his favorite was his parrot which would perch on his shoulder as he mowed the lawn. A fan of jazz all his life, Jim learned to play piano, guitar and harmonica as a child and performed in a local band. He became a Chief Petty Officer while stationed in Honolulu, HI, where he traveled to islands such as Pohnpei and Yap with the Coast Guard and reveled in his role as helper and protector of people throughout Mi Kristen Janet Winslow Dec. While still in high school, Kris spent time traveling in Mexico where she quickly developed a love for the people and their culture, and subsequently an aptitude for the Spanish language.

    Following graduation, she enrolled in the University of California at Davis where she majored in Psychology and minored in Spanish. In the years after college, Kris moved to Lake Tahoe and quickly developed a lasting affinity for the quiet, mountain community. Though she would eventually settle permanently with her family in the East Bay, Kris would frequently visit the Tahoe area with dear friends for the rest of her life. She missed very few local soccer or T-ball games and tournaments. When her sons were in college, she was quick to send care packages, whether they were needed or not.

    Her incomparable thoughtfulness, heart for serv Nancy Elsnab Jan. On August 19th, , Nancy Torrey Elsnab left this life for the next. She made sure to immerse herself in her small town, and knew every face she passed. A fan of the restaurants on Mainstreet, she was a frequent patron of Strizzis, Pastas, and Barones. She spent most of her adult life on St. John Street, raising her 4 children and favorite dog, Flame. They have now been reunited for an endless happy hour, presumably on the shores of tropical beaches.

    Finding herself a single woman in the s, she set out to make a way for herself. A savvy business woman, she discovered a way to have people pay for her favorite hobby — travel. She co-founded Athenour Travel Agency and spent many years leading tours around the world for both novice and seasoned adventurers such as herself. Her favorite country was Kenya, and she made several trips over the years. She would return with a myriad of local souveni Tim passed away peacefully on Monday July 16th, at the age of Tim married Maria, his high school sweetheart September 3rd, in Pleasanton.

    Services to be held am Saturday August 18th at St. Augustine Church Pleasanton John Richard Wortham, 61, of Pleasanton, California, passed away at his home on July 5, , following a short battle with cancer. He enjoyed reading, writing, singing in his church choir, playing guitar, Bible study, travel, and spending time with his family.

    Sally Jean Jantzen Sept. Sally Jean Jantzen passed away on July 3, at the age of She was a long time resident of Pleasanton who hailed from Alameda.

    Genealogy of the James Hannah family.

    Although she had been in frail health for sometime, she was a fighter and always rallied back. She is now at peace and can rest. She is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her youngest sister, Barbara Webb. When her children were young, she was active with 4-H and Girl Scouts.

    She also worked as a bookkeeper for 19 years prior to retirement. A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date Ward D. Belding, Jr. A son of the late Ward D. Belding Sr. He had a long career as a planner and manager for BART. Ward had many interests that he loved and pursued with energy, but even more important to him was sharing those interests with friends and colleagues throughout his life He enjoyed meeting new people, cherished relationships with long-time friends, and valued the memories of shared adventures.

    He was a generous spirit and friend to many. Everett Teves passed away in his Pleasanton home of forty-nine years after a courageous battle against acute myeloid leukemia. He is now at peace. To meet Everett was to be in the presence of an intelligent, loving, and kind human being. Everett was born in Fall River, Massachusetts and drove across country with his family at the age of fourteen to make a life in California and in the Bay Area.

    Everett was a quiet, yet fierce patriot who served his country in the U. Marines during the Korean War, achieving the rank of Staff Sergeant. Everett is survived by his devoted wife, Ilda Teves. This year they would have celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. The surviving family would like to express their gratitude to Dr.

    They are also appreciative of t Al and Sherry were husband and wife for 32 years, with each year bonding them ever more deeply. Al was blessed with a large and loving family. Al loved his wife, children and grandchildren. He was kind, soft-spoken, and always had time to answer a question or solve a problem, no matter how small. Al also had a never-ending love for his mom and dad, his three brothers and two sisters.

    Al had many friends, passions and hobbies, including Nascar, playing guitar, listening to favorite music, and joining his ECV Clamper brothers for memorable outings that made for great stories to tell. Al was talented in carpentry and construction as well. Leonard Mark Jan. Leonard G. Mark, a year resident of Pleasanton, California passed away in his home surrounded by his family at age 87 on June 19th.

    In , Leonard enlisted in the Air Force and during the Korean War he piloted one of the first military jets as a member of the th Fighter Bomber Squadron. In he met and married Martha Scott of Fowler, Ca. They lived in Oakland shortly before putting down roots in Pleasanton where they raised their three children; Kelly, Darin and Jennifer.

    He was very active in the community and the Presbyterian Church where he was the substitute organist and enjoyed being part of the church choir, as well as being one of the original members of the Balloon Platoon. He would often lend his artistic abilities and creativity towards town events. After retiring, he started a framing business, walls, et cetera. Leonard always took the time to listen to others and truly cared about the Gisele Stickler passed away on June 4, after a year battle with Multiple Myeloma. She had a fierce passion for life, an infectious smile, and unwavering strength.

    Her ability to find the positive in every situation, no matter how difficult it may have been, was not only inspiring to all, it also was what made her truly one of a kind. For thirty years she was a devoted wife and lifelong companion to Greg Stickler and beloved mother to Kevin and Danielle. Gisele was the backbone of the Stickler family and a trusted, empathetic friend to so many people.

    Gisele was born and raised in Oakland, CA, to Maurice and Paulette Besse, both lifelong Oakland teachers whose selflessness, compassion, and generosity transformed the lives of countless students over their careers — rare traits that were passed along to their only child, Gisele. Donald Hayes Devlin passed away on May 31, He was born to Virginia and Dr. Harold Devlin in San Francisco, California. He was an avid photographer, boater, movie maker and an 83 year member of the San Francisco Olympic Club. He was a devoted husband, father and a positive influence on family, friends and his Bob Shigemoto Dec.

    Bob Shigemoto passed away on May 30, with his family by his side after a courageous battle with cancer. Bob grew up in Oakland, Ca, and moved to Pleasanton in As a avid sports fan, Bob thoroughly enjoyed every Spring season as a PGSL coach and assistant coach for his daughter's softball teams. Between softball seasons, Bob spent time bicycle touring, riding hundreds of miles throughout the Tri-Valley and Northern California. He also loved watching all manners of sports on TV.

    Bob will always be remembered for his easy going nature, kindness, and patience.

    He will be greatly missed by his wife, Lisa, daughter, Katie, mother, Miyo , sister, Joanne Makishima Dennis and many cousins and close friends Chipper, perky, enthusiastic about everything, game for anything. This was Jan at hello. She grew up in Piedmont, went to Cal Berkeley and settled in Pleasanton to raise her family.

    Jan loved to cook, had a way of making all feel welcome and at ease. She was artistic with beautiful handwriting. She leaves a legacy of love to her husband Ron, daughters Pam and Kim and their husbands, and her 5 grandchildren who were the joy of her life. Franklyn David Smith Dec. The world lost a wonderfully warm, loving yet ambitious gentleman on May 18, Born in Grand Junction, CO. Dec 31, , Frank was one of 8 children, in a tight-knit, hardworking family.

    Working all through his younger years as a paperboy and draftsman in Glendale served him well, paving the way for future successes in business. Many years later, Frank relied on this cultured ingenuity, as he bought into a small company named Porter Seal in the Bay Area. He eventually grew it and molded it to be The Bay Seal Company, which remains a vibrant business and a testament to Frank's life and work ethic.

    In advance of this love affair with business, he met and married the true love of his life, Dessie Mae Shealy a nearby resident and nurse at the time ; they recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary surrounded by their many friends and family wh Jean Ramos Dec. Jean Ramos, age 90, passed away on May 16, , in Pleasanton, California. She is preceded in death by her husband of 62 years, Joseph Ramos. Since early childhood, Jean had a special love and appreciation for horses. Her Grandfather gave her a horse when she was a very young girl which she loved riding in Horse Shows.

    She was a homemaker, dedicated wife and a loving mother. Wayne Allen Dodge Dec. The family relocated to Rubidoux, CA where he and his siblings grew up. He served in the U. They moved north to Pleasanton in where they lived until his passing. Wayne spent his professional career in the insurance industry, earning the Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter designation from the Insurance Education Association.

    He taught underwriting classes for the institute for many years. He served as a loss prevention specialist in workers compensation. He will be remembered for his unconditional love for his family and friends, his incredible sense of humor, his devotion to Bobbie and his unfailing gift for happiness which he gladly shared through his radiant smile for all he met. Susan Jill Miller Oct. Growing up with her three sisters, she always wanted to be a nurse. Her favorite books were the mystery nurse series about Cherry Ames. The family and later her own family loved to play board and card games.

    She married Robert V. They had two children and divorced after 10 years. After 16 years in Pleasanton, she moved to Hawaii for 16 years before returning to Pleasanton for the final 18 years of her working career. Jill loved chocolate and always had a stash somewhere in her home.

    One of her favorite activities was travelling, particularly going to Disneyland with her grandkids and Europe. Her deep faith in God sustained her throughout her life. Jill was a three-time breast cancer survivor and participated in the Pleasanton support group. She worked a Gretchen Piscotty Aug. She was a woman who touched all with her love, care and grace. Beloved mother of Stephen, Nicholas, and Austin, devoted wife and companion to her husband Mike, she was the bedrock of the Piscotty family and a trusted, empathetic friend to the scores of people she met. They were married in at St. Following the wedding, Gretchen and Mike took up residence in Livermore, CA where they began their careers.

    As their family grew, Gretchen lovingly devoted herself to raising their three sons. As the boys started high school, she began to work at Foothill High School and enjoyed working there throughout their college years. She was exceptionally proud of her sons graduating from Stanford, Duke, and soon, St.

    When not in the stands supporting her sons at baseball games, she nurtured their ambitions off the field. Mun J Mar Oct. Mun J. He was 86 years old. He was preceded in death by his first wife Helen Mar. Mun was a loving husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather, and friend to all. When Mun was 7, he immigrated from China to the United States. Mun will be remembered for his genuine warmth, diplomacy, knack for gathering people, fun on the golf course, and being a Chinese foodie befor John E. Harding Sept.

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